D647 Shale & Tight Oil for Technical Professionals (Distance Learning)

Event Facts

Date:
  • 7 Dec. 2020
  • 8 Dec. 2020
  • 9 Dec. 2020
  • 10 Dec. 2020
  • 11 Dec. 2020
Times:
Courses consist of a series of 2-3 hour webinar sessions starting at 14:00 London and 08:00 Houston time. Any variation to this will be communicated in the courses joining instructions
Event Code:
T647b20VC
Sessions:
5 sessions
Instructors:
Steve Hennings
Location:
Virtual
Booking Status:
Good Availability
Fee:
CAD $2,450 (Exclusive of tax)
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Course Facts

Course Code:
D647
Duration:
3 days
Type:
Virtual Classroom
CEU:
2.4 Continuing Education Units
PDH:
24 Professional Development Hours
Certificate:
Certificate Issued Upon Completion

Summary

This live webinar provides a convenient interactive platform for reviewing the latest technical evaluation and development techniques for shale and tight reservoirs.

Published articles and ongoing analysis indicates some practical evaluation and quality control techniques are being over-looked as more of the production correlation and target selection efforts shift to specialized software applications. As a result, the course will emphasize simple methods that provide valuable and timely interpretations.  

The course material is equally split between geoscientific and engineering topics to assist technical team members in speaking the same language while developing integrated solutions.

The webinar is presented in five 3.5-hour segments conducted over a one-week period. Most modules require participants spend fifteen to thirty minutes offline completing example problems or case studies.

Duration and Training Method

This is a virtual  course with lectures, examples and exercises. Participants will earn 2.4 CEUs (Continuing Education Credits) or 24 PDHs (Professional Development Hours).

Participants will learn to:

  1. Rank-order key reservoir properties for successful shale development.
  2. Define how production correlates to completion and hydraulic fracturing options.
  3. Assess the geologic features that create sweet spots and development tiers.
  4. Review the degree of certainty in the most common evaluation techniques.
  5. Quantify and characterize hydrocarbon volumes in various shale plays using pyrolysis, maturity, absorption, adsorption and source rock kinetic concepts.
  6. Identify factors altering hydraulic fracturing objectives and effectiveness.
  7. Define unique and misunderstood concepts applied in unconventional analysis.
  8. Understand how to define the appropriate fracture spacing and well spacing.
  9. Analyze and quality-check pyrograms, isotherms, desorption data, and log data.
  10. Review methods for properly forecasting rates and recoveries for shale. 
  11. List the recent and emerging technologies and their potential benefits.
  12. Evaluate case studies to define the unique attributes of selected shale plays.

Module One

  • Introduction
  • Source Rock Essentials
    • Source Rock Types       
    • Textbook Shale
    • TOC Analysis
  • Depositional Settings
    • Organic Variability       
    • Anoxia and Turbidites
  • Storage and Flow Potential      
    • Porosity Cut-offs  
    • Phi-K Relationships       
    • Recovery Factors
  • Terminology Review
  • Wet Gas Concepts    
    • Barrels Oil Equivalent   
    • Revenue Analysis
  • Key Shale Concepts
  • Case Study

Module Two

  • Organic Maturity 
    • Hydrocarbon Windows 
    • Maturity Indicators
  • Organic Transformation      
    • Type III Gas Generation 
    • Transformation Indicators
  • Terminology Review
  • Geochemistry
    • Source Rock Kinetics 
    • Isotopic Analysis
  • Illitization
  • Electric Log Considerations
    • Core Calibration
    • Spectral GR
    • Analysis Limitations
  • Gas Content Testing
  • Gas Adsorption and Absorption
    • Isotherms
    • Recoverable GIP
  • Case Study

Module Three

  • S1 Core Analysis
  • S2 & Tmax
    • Shortcomings
  • Advance Pyrolysis
    • Test Analysis
    • Quality Control
  • Over-Pressure
  • Seismic Attributes
  • Development Process
    • Reservoir Target Quality
    • Sweet Spots
    • Quick-look Economics
  • Production Forecasting
    • Forecasting Options
    • Decline Curve Options
  • Shale Oil vs. Shale Gas Review
  • Case Study

Module Four

  • Hydraulic Fracturing Objectives
  • Fracture Mechanics
    • Brittleness Indexes
    • Fracture Growth
  • Fracturing Equipment
    • Step Rate Analysis
  • Treatment Monitoring
  • Treatment Stages
    • Stage Construction
  • Quick-look Frac Design
    • Proppant Number Analysis
  • Insitu Stress
    • Terzaghi Analysis
  • Case Study

 

Module Five

  • Natural Fractures
    • Flexure and Corridor Analysis
    • Fracture Rotation
  • Completion Factors
    • Production Correlations
    • Bakken and EF Analysis
  • Frac Fluid Additives
  • Frac Evolution in Horizontals
  • Multi-Stage Technology
    • Selecting Frac Spacing
    • Treatment Types
  • Completion Options
  • Re-Fracs
  • Course Review

 

 

Who should attend

Why You Should Attend?

The course will provide participants a solid technical foundation for evaluating and developing shale and tight oil & gas reservoirs. Emphasis will be placed on geoscientific and engineering concepts that are unique to these plays.

 

Who Should Attend?

The course is intended for those working in the oil & gas industry who are interested in learning more about the technology and challenges for unconventional reservoir evaluation and development. This includes engineers, geoscientists, technical support staff, academics, supervisors, and service industry representatives.

Steve Hennings

Steve Hennings, M.S., P.E. is the owner and principal consultant at Source Rock Engineering in Littleton, Colorado, USA. He is a registered professional engineer with a Bachelor’s degree in Petroleum Engineering and a Master’s degree in Finance. Steve worked for a major energy company during his first 20 years in the oil & gas industry where he completed a wide variety of reservoir, well completion, and production engineering assignments. His very first assignment was to evaluate ways to optimize hydraulic fracturing treatments and improve forecasting methods, and Steve continues to focus attention on those issues. During his career he also led engineering and geoscience teams for: the largest U.S. oil field, the largest underground coal mine in Australia, and a prestigious petroleum laboratory and research center. For the past ten years Steve has focused exclusively on unconventional reservoirs in the United States, Canada, Australia, China, India and other countries. He also occasionally conducts private or public technical workshops to share lessons learned from his on-going participation in exploration and development efforts. Steve is a member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers, Rocky Mountain Association of Geologists, and the Society of Mining Engineers. In 2008 he shared the annual Stefanko Award for his technical presentations.

Alternative Dates for this Course